How to use Unexpected Activity Notifications to Protect Your Home

by | Sep 18, 2020 | Uncategorized | 0 comments

When you are a parent, life is full of surprises. Some of it is more enjoyable than others.

Your kids made you breakfast in bed? That’s wonderful. Your kids got into the kitchen and painted the ground purple? That’s not quite so wonderful.

To protect you or your kids from bad ideas that seemed good at that time, Alarm.com has established Unexpected Activity notifications. They’re a new kind of proactive, intelligent protection powered by our Insights Engine, which looks out for your loved ones by learning your everyday behavior patterns and letting you know when something is up.

You don’t need to do anything to install this new smart home feature. Alarm.com’s Insights Engine works as part of the smart home security system which powers your home. With time, you can train it with simple “useful / not useful” feedback that the Insights Engine will adapt to. You may also elect to pause for twenty-four hours if a sudden schedule change, like a sick day, begins triggering alerts.

Unusual Activity notifications can be triggered by all kinds of sensors around your home, including contact sensors on windows and doors, and motion sensors that you’ve placed in dangerous or prohibited areas.

Here are just five sections of your house where an Unexpected Activity alert can help save the day:

1. External doors

On weekday mornings, your front door sees a lot of action. On weekend mornings – not so much… So why did it just open at 6:30? Answer: your curious four-year old is researching the front yard while you’re still waking up with your first cup of coffee. This Unusual Activity notification would alert you to the situation in virtually no time at all.

2. Laundry room

Your basement might feature a comfortable family room complete with cozy couches and a large television. Odds are there’s also a laundry area down there, too. It’s frequently fascinating to kids. A motion detector in this region can let you know if there’s unexpected interest around your washer and dryer.

3. Medicine bathroom cabinet

For young kids, the bathroom could be your home’s most hazardous place –particularly once they’re in a position to move and climb onto a chair to search their shelves on their own. Place a contact sensor on your bathroom closet to know instantly if it’s accessed outside your regular routine.

4. Top of the stairs 

Whether it is a bad dream or even a stomach pain, each kid will sometimes get up and wander in the middle of the night. In case their bedroom is near the stairs, having an alert to this activity may help you avoid the threat of a sleepy kid taking a fall.

5. Door to the garage

With tools and shelves, your garage is possibly the most appealing space of your home to curious children. As you’re frequently in there on the weekends, a weekday alert from your inner garage door’s contact sensor can signal that youngsters are attempting to get hands-on with the tools or paints inside.

Want to find out more?

To find out how other parents use Alarm.com, read ADC’s article here. If you’d like to get started with smarter home security, All Systems Integrated is here for you. Connect with us today to learn more about the power of Alarm.com’s innovative Insights Engine and get started with a free quote on a new smart security system for your home.

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